Six Minor Characters I’d Elevate into Iconic Character Roles in Marvel and DC

I’ve thought a lot about how to bring comics into newer times, and I really think there needs to be some casting changes. Now I’m not saying we have to ditch the ionic characters, but it’s time to see other characters stepping up and becoming icons themselves. Not to mention, this might start attracting a bigger audience.

Six Minor Characters I’d Elevate into Iconic Character Roles

Pepper Potts as Rescue (Iron Man)

Pepper Potts as Iron Man

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She-Hulk: Ceremony Part 1 and Part 2

In 1989, Dwayne McDuffie, along with Robin Chaplik and June Brigman, wrote She-Hulk Ceremony, a two-part mini-series about the Sensational She-Hulk and her ex-boyfriend Wyatt Wingfoot. Stan Drake does the art.

In this story, She-Hulk decides she wants a baby with Wyatt, gets a mysterious mystical basket, and travels to visit Wyatt’s family to announce their engagement. But finds out that it’s much, much more.

Spoilers.

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Strong Women of Comics I Like

This post is inspired by a comment over on Whedonesque about what one is to do without Joss writing Astonishing X-Men. Without Joss there to write strong women. This post assumes that AXM is the only mainstreet comic that the poster has read (i.e. the Firefly and Buffy/Angel comics don’t count). I will also decline to comment on Joss and strong women. Instead, I give you – Strong Women of Comics I Like:

She-Hulk
Jennifer Walter aka She-Hulk

Anyone who’s known me longer than five seconds probably knows about my love of She-Hulk. Jennifer Walters is the Hulk’s cousin and received superpowers when she was shot and got a blood transfusion from him. It saved her life, but made her transform into “some kind of She-Hulk.”

She-Hulk maintains her human sensibilities when she’s in hulk form and prefers to be big and green instead of tiny Jennifer. She’s had her own titles, but has also been a member of the Fantastic Four and the Avengers. She is often relayed upon for both her superpowers and her mind.

When the Earth is attacked by Scorpio and the U.N. gives its power to the Avengers, She-Hulk not only fights, but she also is the one who reads the U.N. carters to help the crashing world economies. In more current history, she’s was a top lawyer in a superhuman law firm and S.H.I.E.L.D. agent and now a bounty hunter.

I suggest reading Dan Slott’s She-Hulk, starting with She-Hulk Volume 1: Single Green Female.

Jessica Jones
Jessica Jones

Jessica Jones is a newer Marvel character created by Brian Micheal Bendis in 2002 and was inserted into the Avengers’ history. When you meet her, she runs a private detective agency and has a variety of personal problems include a temper, poor interpersonal skills, bad relationships, and problem with drinking. Her first outing in her own series Alias gives the reader the mystery of why Jessica is no longer a superhero and doesn’t want to be one.

Jessica gained her superpowers — flying, super strength, and resistance to damage — through a tragic car crash with her family’s sedan and a truck carrying nuclear waste. However, she is often reluctant to use them.

Her more recent storylines include her relationship/eventual marriage to superhero Luke Cage, their baby, and how she (kind of) joins the Avengers and mentors the Young Avengers. One of my favorite scenes is where a pregnant Jessica beats up on the Green Goblin in a way that makes even Spider-Man acknowledge that she’s tough as nails.

I suggest starting off with Brian Michael Bendis’ Alias, which is her origin story(s) and first appearances.

Snow White
Snow White

Snow White is a character in Bill Willingham’s Fables, a comic set in modern-day NYC with “fables” living in hiding in the middle of the city. Snow White is introduced as the Deputy Major of Fabletown and clearly the one who’s really in charge of the city’s operations. She’s the only one not afraid of Bigby, the Big Bad Wolf who’s the town’s sheriff, and she always thinks on her feet despite the antics of her sister, Rose Red; an impending war with evil Fables; and when her ex-husband Prince Charming decides to come back into town and run for Mayor.

Snow White’s story is interwoven into this cast in the on-going comic. And while there are certainly other strong women — Frau Totenkinder, Cinderella, Rose Red, the Snow Queen, etc. — Snow White remains my personal favorite. She even gets her own narrative in the flashback book of Fable’s tales 1001 Nights of Snowfall.

I’d suggest starting at the beginning of the Fables‘ series with Legends in Exile.

Dr. Mann and Agent 355
Agent 355, Dr. Allison Mann, and the other women of Y: The Last Man

Brian K. Vaughan’s Y: The Last Man is about Yorrick and his male monkey, the only survivors of whatever killed all the male mammals on the planet, and their quest to find Yorrick’s girlfriend Beth and figure out what the hell actually happened. Vaughan populates the book with a wonderful cast of female characters including Agent 355, the tough American spy who protect Yorrick, Dr. Allison Mann, a genetics doctor who clones herself, and Yorrick’s sister and mother, the latter is a U.S. senator and then president when all the men die off. Additionally, all the women in this story are given agency and come from various backgrounds, ethnically and politically. Vaughan truly makes this story a global story. Plus, Pia Guerra’s art is incredible throughout this book.

I’d suggest starting with Unmanned, the first volume in this recently ended series.

Renee Montoya
Rene Montoya aka The Question

Rene first appeared on the animated Batman TV show and was so popular that she was put in Ed Brubaker and Greg Rucka’s Gotham Central. She’s a hard-lined, but at her core, good detective on the Gotham Police Force with ties to the community through her family and the Hispanic community. In Half a Life, she takes center stage with her collaboration and then stalking problem with Two-Face. She’s outed as lesbian in one the best coming out stories I’ve ever read. (And that says a lot considering I’m a bisexual English major who took many “diversity” literature courses.)

Rucka took Montoya even further than her police roots by putting her in the post-Crisis epic 52, which was where I first encountered her outside cartoons. Montoya is one of the characters in the story to have an amazingly done transformation with the publicity bonus of her ex-girlfriend, Kate Kane, aka the new Batwoman. Post-52, Montoya’s story continues in Crime Bible and then Final Crisis: Revelations.

I’d suggest starting with the first hardcover Gotham Central #01: In the Line of Duty, which includes the “Half a Life” story.

Barbara Gordon
Barbara Gordon aka Batgirl aka Oracle and the rest of the women of Birds of Prey

Barbara Gordon starts off her crime-fighting career as Batgirl, fighting alongside Batman, Robin, and a host of other DC superheros as part of the Bat-family. She is, of course, the daughter of Jim Gordon, Gotham’s Police Commissioner. Besides, being kick ass, Barbara is also super smart and a whiz with computers. She is shown to be perhaps the only person who can outspy Batman, the world’s greatest detective.

In Moore’s Batman: The Killing Joke (1988), Barbara is shot by the Joker and paralyzed from the waist down. Now, the normal person would hang up the cape and become head of her own internet start-up company, but not Barbara. No, she uses her computer genius to fight crime under the name Oracle and assembles her own, all-female team, Birds of Prey.

Birds of Prey contains many awesome strong women over the years, including Black Canary, Huntress, the new Batgirl, Spoiler, Lady Shiva, and more. Black Canary and Barbara’s friendships is perhaps one of the best portrayals female-friendships ever.

For Batgirl’s origins, I suggest Beatty and Dixon’s Batgirl: Year One and for more current Birds of Prey action, Simone’s Of Like Minds.

Ms. Marvel
Carol Danvers aka Ms. Marvel

Ms. Marvel should be the Wonder Woman of Marvel-verse. However, she’s not. She should also be Captain Marvel, like she was in House of M, but she’s not. If you’re scratching your head, don’t worry, you’ll eventually understand what I mean. Because Ms. Marvel is just that awesome.

Carol starts her life as a Air Force officer working with the then Captain Marvel, who was actually a Kree (a type of alien) undercover. She becomes super-powered when hit by a Kree “Psyche-Magnitron” device and has super strength, speed, stamina, and durability; can absorb energy; and can fly. She goes through many trials and tribulations including being the mind-controlled slave and mystical womb of a guy trying to reincarnated himself, having her powers sucked out by Rogue, and being kidnapped and experimented on by the Brood (another alien species).

Ms. Marvel is a survivor and she never looses her military officer determination. She bounces back and becomes a New Avenger, after the original Avengers are destroyed. Currently, post-Civil War, Tony Stark (Iron Man) has made her the head of the Mighty Avengers. She also has a solo series, which is about her getting her life in order after seeing an alternative version of herself as Captain Marvel, the greatest and most revered superhero in that world.

You can read about the start of her self-improvement in Reed’s Ms. Marvel.

Wonder Woman
Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman is the most famous female superhero around. Linda Carter’s portrayal of her in the ’70s TV show cemented her fame and everyone knowing her name. Created in 1941 by William Moulton Marston, Wonder Woman has survived when other lesser heroes have faded in time. She’s an Amazon princess warrior. She’s good, courageous, diplomatic, and has a great body. Who doesn’t want to be her?

Overall, Wonder Woman is a class act and you’d be hard-pressed to find another character with such dignity who can still kick ass. Heck, even Mr. Goodie Superman dates and marries her (when Lois Lane isn’t available, of course).

Wonder Woman has gone through many writers over the years, but if you’d like to catch up on current Wonder Woman happenings, check out Gail Simone’s run of Wonder Woman (Vol 3 starting at issue #14) or pick up the first tpb Wonder Woman: The Circle. I also hold a special love for Rucka’s Wonder Woman: Hiketeia

Old Lace and Gert
Gert, Nico, Molly, Karolina and the rest of the Runaways

Runaways is a great title to start with for someone who hasn’t read a lot of comics, considering that it’s basically a self-contained story. (There are crossovers here and there, but the writers do a good job at explaining just who those people are.) The basic premise is that a group of kids spy on their parents and find out their parents are actually super villains plotting the destruction of the world. And they runaway…

Gert with her glasses and cynicism is a daughter of time travelers who owns the coolest pet ever, Old Lace, a Deinonychus (similar to a Velociraptor). Nico is a loyal witch who has her heart played with more than once. Molly, the youngest of them at the beginning, is a mutant with budding powers. Karolina is a free-spirit alien and a self-described “freak” of the group, even before she knew she was an alien. And that’s just a few of the female characters.

I’d suggest starting with Vaughan’s Runaways Vol 1 to journey with this newer group from their origins and into the present.

Ten Things I Wish for Future She-Hulk Comics

1. Characters of color and I don’t mean the green kind. I can praise this comic in the way Slott writes women, but really where is the racial diversity?

2. Queer characters. Also lacking.

3. A signal to the final end of John and Jen’s marriage. Even Jen signing divorce papers would do or making a side comment to Pug when he asks where her husband is.

4. Pug. More Pug and a mending of a relationship between Jen and Pug. I’m not saying that they have to hook up and live happily forever after. But a “I was wrong. No, you were wrong.” And what about the magic anti-love spell? (I do have faith that this will get wrapped up, but I’m impatient.)

5. One of Jen’s cases being the A plot. Starfox was almost an A plot, but not quite. Maybe Captain America could hire her when he comes back from the dead.

6. For Jen to get a day off where she just has fun at home. Seriously, there’s probably some meta about repairing drywall that Slott could write.

7. Matching covers with inside art better. Horn needs to focus less on perfect circles and super saturated colors.

8. The return of Awesome Andy.

9. Jen bonding with some of her female buddies over something besides boys. Or really just her hanging out with the gals would be nice. Her and Mallory having a beer n’ bitch night or Janet stopping by for a cup of coffee.

10. A nice long run for this title and less people going “She who?” when I mention that She Hulk’s my favorite superhero. Marvel, if you need a marketer, I’m here, but only if I can telecommute. I’ll be the first one lined up for a She Hulk t-shirt.

Bendis’ Avengers Disassembled

I do enjoy how nicely this sets up for Slott’s run.

However, I was not thrilled that all the women – She Hulk, Wasp, and Captain Britain – were take out of the running right away. I don’t see Jen as that fearful of the hulk taking her over the way that it does Bruce. And while it’s a comment on how hulk powers can get completely out of the control – and how really dumb it is to have the Hulk, as in Bruce, on a team – it’s not dumb to have Jen. Her powers manifest as yes, a little too carefree of an individual and too much a party girl, but she still maintains the human mind.

That and I think Jen’s gotten more pissed about other things besides a teammate’s death if she was going to lose control over something. Starfox, anyone?

So yes, she can lose control, but the Scarlet Witch took it to an extreme. I’ll admit that my She-Hulk-as-an-Avenger canon isn’t that solid, so there may have been forward shadowing. But I still think it was an easy elimination.

At least, Ms. Marvel came back in to represent for the women.

It’s also interesting that She Hulk uses Jen as a cover when she needs her.

Shulkie Debates

The last issues of She Hulk has caused an uproar. (Because life has been kicking my ass, I have not actually got around to reading the issue and don’t want to weigh in until I have.) However, I have links.

Brainfreeze talks about #16

Other Magazine on #16: The guy who never bathes calls She-Hulk “sloppy.” Ohhhh kay…

Ragnell talks about Where She Hulk Lost Me

Mildredmilton response to Ragnell with She-Hulk, Sexual Assault, and Why I Think Dan Slott Did a Good Job

Rhyannonwrites questions Where She Hulk is going in terms of sexuality and being a competent, smart woman.

Iamza discusses her problems with the current plot in response to Rhyannonwrites.