Reviews: Atomic Robo Vol 1

Atomic Robo Vol 1Erica gives this comic five starsAtomic Robo Vol 1 by Brian Clevinger

Atomic Robo and the Fightin’ Scientists of Tesladyne is perhaps one of the most brilliant comics I’ve read in a while. Love it little pieces: the humor, the mixing of genres, Robo’s solution to everything being blowing it up. It just works so well.

I love the care and detail put into designing Atomic Robo. He doesn’t look like other robots. I don’t think Cybermen, Data, or Cylons. I think Atomic Robo, the wacky fighting scientist who’s pretty indestructible.

This story is smart in how it frames Robo’s first battle against Dr. Helsingard and how he becomes Robo’s nemesis. Actually, I like that it was by accident. I like Helsingard being the obsessive one and swearing revenge on Robo, but Robo not really caring. He’s almost taking down Helsingard’s evil plans by accident.

The first issue is a little slow, but it really takes off from there and doesn’t stop. I didn’t want to put it down. In fact, I didn’t, reading it from cover to cover.

The part with Robo reflecting on his now-deceased WWII army buddy Charlie worked brilliantly in both establishing Robo’s age, but also his emotions. Especially since before that he either seemed to be enthusiastically blowing stuff up or annoyed at people trying to destroy him.

And it’s good to see that Robo’s fame hasn’t gone to his head.

Of course, there was mummies.

The story about Robo going to Mars was brilliant. I love Stephen Hawking hacking his psychological profile, and Robo not having enough magazines to last him the trip. Robo writing “Stephen Hawking is a bastard” on Mars in rocks, while being extremely happy about it was brilliant. It does remind me of the Tick villain writing on the moon.

Atomic Robo: Stephen Hawking is a bastard

I also enjoy how subtle the characterization of Robo’s team comes out in their crisis management. Granted Jenkins’ gets his short-story in the B-sides.

Of course, Robo killed Helsingard and blew the top of the pyramid. And like any good villain, Helsingard has back-ups. Of his brain. Mwahaha.

Atomic Robo is pure fun and enjoyment.

Read about this awesome robot and support this blog, buy Atomic Robo TPB Volume 1: Atomic Robo & the Fightin’ Scientists of Tesladyne.

Six Minor Characters I’d Elevate into Iconic Character Roles in Marvel and DC

I’ve thought a lot about how to bring comics into newer times, and I really think there needs to be some casting changes. Now I’m not saying we have to ditch the ionic characters, but it’s time to see other characters stepping up and becoming icons themselves. Not to mention, this might start attracting a bigger audience.

Six Minor Characters I’d Elevate into Iconic Character Roles

Pepper Potts as Rescue (Iron Man)

Pepper Potts as Iron Man

Continue reading “Six Minor Characters I’d Elevate into Iconic Character Roles in Marvel and DC”

Reviews Assault On New Olympus, Incredible Hercules #138-139, and Agents of Atlas backup

Comic book reviews for Assault On New Olympus by Greg Pak and Fred Van Lente, Agents of Atlas by Jeff Parker, The Incredible Hercules #138 by Greg Pak and Fred Van Lente, Agents of Atlas by Jeff Parker, The Incredible Hercules #139 by Greg Pak and Fred Van Lente, and Agents of Atlas by Jeff Parker

Assault on New Olympus Incredible Hercules #138 Incredible Hercules #139 Continue reading “Reviews Assault On New Olympus, Incredible Hercules #138-139, and Agents of Atlas backup”

Flashback Reviews: Preacher: Gone to Texas

Preacher Vol 1 Gone to TexasErica gives this comic three starsPreacher: Gone to Texas by Garth Ennis

Perhaps this book suffered too much pre-hype for me, because I read it years later after everyone had been ranting and raving about how awesome it was. (I think it’s good to mention this because it colors my review, not because I think it’s wrong to find this book awesome.) Perhaps I read Preacher too late in my own personal reading history to really appreciate it. Don’t get me wrong, I did enjoy Preacher: Gone to Texas. It was entertaining. But when it ended, I didn’t really care if I went out and bought the next volume of it.

I found myself a bit jolted by how the book started off with Jesse, Cassidy, and Tulip in a diner, talking like old friends. I understand why Ennis didn’t want to tell a completely linear story, and how he wanted to jump into the real meat of it right away. However, the old friends is a problem. I assumed they all knew each other for a long-time. Of course, Jesse and Tulip have; they just haven’t seen each other in a good while. But Cassidy is a complete newcomer to them. Continue reading “Flashback Reviews: Preacher: Gone to Texas”