The Best and the Worst of 2011 Comic Books

Yes, the time has come to say goodbye to 2011 and ring in 2012. Here’s a look back at the Best and the Worst of 2011* Comic Books.

The Best On-Going Series

Echo #261. Echo by Terry Moore
Average rating: 4.7/5 stars
Reading rating: Teen

Moore’s Echo finished with a bang (or did it?) this year. A story of Julie, the unlikely superhero, and stopping the end of the world, Moore’s work is consistently great and on-point. For those scared of the tome that is Strangers in Paradise, check out this much shorter work.
Read my reviews of Echo.
Purchase Echo.

Punisher #52. Punisher by Greg Rucka, Marco Checchetto, Matthew Clark, and Matthew Southworth
Average rating: 4.3/5 stars
Reading rating: Teen

I never thought I’d like a Punisher book as much as I love this one from Rucka. Dive into the gritty world of Frank Castle, his mission, and the fall-out of villains, reporters, cops, and victims. With some beautiful art to accompany it.
Read my reviews of Punisher.
Purchase Punisher.

Batwoman #23. Batwoman by J.H. Williams, W. Haden Blackman, and Amy Reeder Hadley
Average rating: 4.3/5 stars
Reading rating: Teen

The most anticipated comic (for me) ever. Anyone reading my blog is probably not surprised that I love Batwoman. Kate Kane is probably one of my favorite characters ever, and in combination with Williams’ art, this title has been making me very happy. I only want more.
Read my reviews of Batwoman.
Purchase Batwoman. Continue reading “The Best and the Worst of 2011 Comic Books”

Reviews Kevin Smith’s Quiver

This post is by guest blogger, Steve Stone. Steve never minces words, and that’s why he’s been my friend for some time now. He’s opinionated, loves Batman, and wears an awesome BeDazzled tie. Steve’s spent a few Friday nights on my couch, educating Jason and I about the Justice League via the animated television show. And don’t even get him started on The Watchmen. This is Steve’s first attempt to open up his opinions to a wider audience than those who sit next to him on Seattle public transportation.

Quiver by Kevin Smith with art by Phil Hester
by Steve Stone

Quiver

For a period of time, I was a Kevin Smith sycophant. It started with Dogma, progressed backwards to Clerks and led until Jersey Girl. At this point, my boyish ideals led on to the names of Nolan, Boyle, and Scorsese. The one area that Smith still has a leg up on all is his writing and this is none the more evident than in Quiver. The resurrection (literally in this case) of Oliver Queen could not have done with more text and character development. From the jabs of Batman (dickhead form of course, the best Bruce Wayne) to the screaming head of Spectre coming off of Hal Jordan’s Green Lantern form, only Smith could have mixed the grace and pure assery of the dirty, liberal Oliver. Continue reading “Reviews Kevin Smith’s Quiver”